Annual Report 2013 | Suomeksi |

Employees and work conditions

LA1 Total workforce by employment type and employment contract, broken down by region and gender

In 2013, an average of 10,246 employees (2012: 10,600) worked at Fortum. The biggest number of employees was in Russia, 4,245 employees (2012: 4,301) on average. Subcontractor employees worked at Fortum sites for a total of approximately 1,961,526 (2012: 1,900,000) days during the year. The figure is based on contractors' hourly logs and on estimates based on job costs and average hourly rates. The figure has been calculated on the basis of an 8-hour work day.

The number of Fortum's permanent employees on 31 December 2013 was 9,515 (2012: 9,899), i.e. 96.2% (2012: 95.4%) of the personnel. The number of full-time employees

was 9,264 (2012: 9,644) and part-time 251 (2012: 255). The percentage of fixed-term employees was 3.8% (2012: 4.6%).

Workforce by employment contract and employment type, broken down by region and gender
Finland Sweden Russia Poland Other countries Total
M F M F M F M F M F M F
Employment contract
Permanent 1,743 645 1,335 550 2,894 1,049 496 137 464 202 6,932 2,583
Fixed-term 53 36 22 32 136 83 1 2 1 5 213 158
Employment type (permanently employed)
Full-time 1,692 592 1,287 484 2,891 1,045 496 137 458 182 6,824 2,440
Part-time 51 53 48 66 3 4 0 0 6 20 108 143
Personnel statistics from 2013, by country of operation
Finland Sweden Russia Poland Other countries Total
Personnel at year-end 2,477 1,939 4,162 636 672 9,886
male 1,796 1,357 3,030 497 465 7,145
female 681 582 1,132 139 207 2,741
Personnel,
average
2,616 1,993 4,245 660 732 10,246
Personnel expenses,
1,000 euros
208,142* 177,085 87,905 14,881 40,786* 528,799*
Personnel expenses per 
person, 1,000 euros
79,6* 88.9 20.7 22.5 55,7* 51.6
*) The figures have been changed after the assurance in March 2014
Personnel by division, 31 Dec.
2013 2012 2011
Power 1,709 1,846 1,847
Heat 2,102 2,212 2,504
ESD 1,348 1,379 1,417
Russia 4,162 4,253 4,379
Other 565 681 633
Total 9,886 10,371 10,780
Service years1) of the permanent employees in 2012-2013, %
2013 2012
0-5 yrs. 34 35
6-10 yrs. 18 15
11-15 yrs. 10 10
16-20 yrs. 10 10
21-26 yrs. 11 11
27-30 yrs. 8 9
31+ 9 10
1) Data was not collected in 2011.

LA2 Total number and rate of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, country and gender


During the year, 552 (2012: 878) new employees joined Fortum and 910 (2012: 1,176) employment relationships were terminated. Divestments reduced the number of personnel by a total of 126 (2012: 259). There were 36 (2012: 36) employees on international assignment. Departure turnover in 2013 was 9.7% (2012: 12%)

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Total number and rate of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, country and gender
New employee hires Finland Sweden Russia Poland Other countries
M F M F M F M F M F
no. no. no. no. no. no. no. no. no. no.
-25 0 1 8 1 59 18 0 0 0 3
25-29 9 4 13 3 80 26 1 0 10 4
30-34 12 1 7 3 59 13 1 0 5 2
35-39 9 2 13 4 25 8 0 0 4 2
40-44 4 0 9 1 19 8 2 0 8 1
45-49 0 2 2 1 12 2 3 1 4 0
50-54 3 1 4 1 18 5 5 1 6 0
55-59 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 1
60+ 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 8 0
New recruits, % 1.6 0.5 3.0 0.7 7.0 2.1 2.2 0.3 9.2 2.6
Employees leaving Finland Sweden Russia Poland Other countries
M F M F M F M F M F
no. no. no. no. no. no. no. no. no. no.
-25 1 0 2 5 25 7 0 0 4 1
25-29 10 3 3 4 37 17 2 0 14 3
30-34 19 3 13 10 34 20 4 2 17 1
35-39 17 6 14 12 37 10 2 1 10 2
40-44 17 8 16 8 27 22 5 2 11 1
45-49 10 4 16 5 28 11 7 4 15 4
50-54 13 4 10 6 34 11 5 5 8 3
55-59 18 2 13 5 32 13 11 5 8 3
60+ 16 0 19 2 27 11 5 5 16 6
Departure turnover, % 5.1 1.3 5.6 3.0 7.1 3.1 6.5 3.8 20.2 4.7

LA3 Employee benefits for full-time employees

In principle, Fortum's employee benefits are country-specific and comply with local legislation and the prevailing market situation. Local market practices and eligibility criteria are followed for typical fringe benefits and include, for example, car and mobile phone benefits. These benefits are mainly for permanent employees. In addition to fringe benefits, Fortum also provides various employee benefits. These include, for example, occupational health care, longevity pay for years of service, discounted electricity prices and recreational and leisure activities. These benefits are mainly for all employees.

Fortum in Finland is participating in the Tekes EVE - Electric Vehicle Systems Programme; employees choosing an electric company car will receive monthly monetary subsidy. The

subsidy applies to battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs).

Fortum encourages its employees to exercise and to enjoy culture. In Finland, Sweden and Russia, all Fortum employees can join different personnel clubs offering activities related to sports, nature and the arts.

In 2013, Fortum's support for employee recreational and leisure activities in Finland was EUR 338,387 (2012: 415,000). The support included clubs, fitness and culture vouchers, and activities related to vacation homes. In Sweden, the support for clubs was EUR 121,622 (2012: 111,100). In Poland, support for employee fitness activities amounted to EUR 8,860 (2012: 19,300). In Russia, support for employee social programmes was about EUR 200,000 (2012: 309,000).

Labour/management relations

Collaboration between employees and Fortum management is based on local legislation and the Code of Conduct. In Finland, Fortum's employee representation system is site- and company- and division-specific, and representatives in the co-operation bodies are chosen by the employee representatives from amongst themselves. Group collaboration meetings in Finland are held at least twice a year in conjunction with the Group's financial statements and interim reports.

In addition to Group collaboration meetings, there are also division- or function-level co-operation bodies that meet a few times per year. The co-operation and employment group is comprised of seven representatives chosen from amongst the delegates. This group holds meetings under the supervision of Senior Vice President, Human Resources approximately five

times per year; it is the decision making body in Finland-level collaboration issues and it also appoints personnel representatives for the preparation of various development projects.

In Sweden, the system is fundamentally identical. In Sweden, collaboration between personnel representatives and Fortum management at the central level takes place in the Council (Sverigerådet) that convenes twice a year. The collaboration forms are based on the agreement made between the company and personnel representatives. Additionally, there are a significant number of meetings held locally during the year.

In Estonia, the Working Councils convened five times during 2013. These councils are for co-operation between an employer and the employees' representatives and focus on

resolving, for example, occupational health and safety issues in the enterprise. Additionally, there are meetings between personnel representatives and employer representatives on an as-needed basis.

In Poland, some 35 meetings were arranged with the local labour union. The meetings focused on salary- and benefits-related issues, occupational safety, improving collaboration, and harmonisation of benefits.

In Russia, in line with local legislation, the collective bargaining agreement and the Fortum Code of Conduct, division management closely collaborates with union representatives within the labour relations board and veteran council. These bodies meet on an as-needed basis to resolve various matters related to management and employees' relations.

As a rule, the Fortum European Council (FEC) convenes once a year. FEC is a Europe-wide co-operation body where employees and employer representatives meet to discuss Fortum matters. In 2013, the Fortum European Council (FEC) held a meeting in May in Finland, and personnel representatives from Finland, Sweden, Poland, Norway and Estonia participated. Issues on the Council's agenda included the CEO's current review; themed workshops included occupational health and safety, well-being as well as improving communication and the handling of confidential information.

LA4 Coverage of collective bargaining agreements

Fortum respects its employees' freedom of association and collective bargaining, and does not monitor the degree of

unionisation of its employees. Fortum applies local collective bargaining agreements in all countries where it operates, in compliance with the scope of each respective agreement.

LA5 Minimum notice period regarding operational changes

In situations of organisational restructuring, Fortum negotiates with personnel representatives in compliance with each country's local legislation and contractual procedures. The minimum notice period is based on local legislation, collective agreements or employment contracts, which are in harmony with local legislation and agreements. In situations involving personnel reductions, Fortum aims primarily to support the re-employment of its personnel.

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